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Why clients don’t trust you enough to hire you

By August 6, 2018March 29th, 2019Marketing

Trust-Based Marketing

Most of us get confidence from copying others whose marketing we can see.

(But we can’t usually see their results, can we?)

When you market your practice the right way, in a way that carefully and consistently builds trust, then…

You’ll get confidence from amazing results.

If you want better marketing results you have to be strategic.

You have to build trust steadily and consistently

Is it easy? No, of course not. Building trust takes time and thoughtfulness.

If you want “easy” go with the herd and sign up for one of those off-the-shelf “lead generation packages” that too many lawyers fall for.

But stop and consider: when did something “off-the-shelf” help establish trust?

Think about this before you outsource your marketing to some “well-regarded online marketing service.” (e.g. Findlaw)

Think about the 9 questions clients will unconsciously ask themselves before they commit to hiring a lawyer.

  1. Are they knowledgeable and competent? (Authority)
  2. Do they really care about their clients as people? (Empathy)
  3. Do I understand enough about what s/he’s going to do for me? (Clarity)
  4. Are they appropriate for me? (Compatibility)
  5. Are they for real? (Authenticity)
  6. Am I making the best choice vs. other choices? (Superiority)
  7. Are they telling me the truth? (Believability)
  8. Are their fees reasonable? (Value)
  9. Overall, can they be relied on? (Safety)

If you want more good clients, you need to address ALL of those questions.

Most lawyers take comfort copying others’ marketing approach (the easy path). But now you know it’s better to…

Do the hard work of building trust in a way that leads to you getting more high-quality clients.

If you want to learn more about Trust-Based Marketing read Dan Kennedy’s book The No B.S. Guide to Trust-Based Marketing.


The Bottom Line…

Too many lawyers struggle to get a “cash flow friendly” stream of high-quality clients. The problem is they don’t know the vital elements of effective marketing.

Most solo & small firm lawyers have vague assumptions about how marketing works. This ignorance creates insidious dangers.

For example, when lawyers become too desperate for clients they tend to trust those they shouldn’t trust. People such as greedy consultants, or well-intentioned-but-clueless amateurs (i.e. “marketing morons“).

If you’ve been given bad marketing advice, or if you feel less than 100% certain how to market your practice effectively do NOT spend any more money on websites, consultants or advertisements.

Instead, sign up for this course immediately (at least sign up for the FREE preview version).


P.S. If you appreciate these kinds of observations, you might want to read this as well.