Urgent vs. Important tasks

By August 2, 2019April 10th, 2020Approach, focus

Do you want to maximize the use of your time and achieve extraordinary things?

Then you must understand the crucial difference between what’s urgent and what’s important.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower is known for having first emphasized this difference:

I have two kinds of problems, the urgent and the important. The urgent are not important, and the important are never urgent.

The “Eisenhower matrix” is a powerful decision-making tool that helps you prioritize your precious time.

The trick to using the Eisenhower matrix is to realize that most things that masquerade as “urgent” aren’t actually urgent. And, according to Eisenhower urgent things are never important.

What he meant was: important long-range strategic goals are never urgent. But they’re important so they need to be prioritized above all else—even matters that are (or seem) urgent.

The only way to achieve your important goals is to create habits of thinking, deciding and acting that suppress the strong tendency to reflexively prioritize urgent things over important ones.

And the best way to stay on track is to avoid people who steer you towards “shiny objects” or “low-hanging fruit.”

If you know you need to focus more on important elements in your practice then you might be interested in this upcoming conference.

For a lot lawyers right now it’s crunch time. And that’s the best time to sort out what’s truly important.