Effective management

By April 19, 2019 Law, Productivity, Wisdom

Have you read Peter Drucker’s The Effective Executive, by any chance?

It’s widely considered one of the best books on self-management in business. And since running your practice is a business, you should be aware of it.

Even better, you should own a copy and read it closely.

Well-known business coach and best-selling author Jim Collins said he’s read the book dozens of times. So that should tell you something.

Here are some nuggets from the book so you can get a flavor of the wisdom…

“To be reasonably effective it is not enough…to be intelligent, to work hard, or to be knowledgeable. Effectiveness is something separate, something different.”

Drucker admonishes that effectiveness “has to be learned.” That is, no one is naturally gifted at being effective.

A famous quote from Drucker is: “Efficiency is doing things right. Effectiveness is doing the right things.”

In other words, it’s not natural for us to instinctively know which things are the right things to do.

We have to learn. But from whom?

And who, specifically, should lawyers learn from?

Well, ideally, from lawyers who’ve learned themselves what are the right things to do.

Ever wonder who those people might be? Well, let me help you out…

I’ve previously written about who my “competitors” are (so that’s one place to start looking).

And Lawyerist has compiled an assessment of folks who help solo & small firm lawyers learn to manage their practices more effectively.

There aren’t enough reviews at the Lawyerist assessment page to give meaningful data, but it’s better than nothing.

I know this…

If I were starting my solo practice today, I’d get help from someone who could help me to more effectively manage and market my practice.

I’d look for someone with a good track record of helping other lawyers like me, and someone whose values were in sync with mine.

Oh, and here’s one more good Drucker quote that makes a ton of sense to me…

“Good executives focus on opportunities rather than problems…Problem solving, however necessary, does not produce results. It prevents damage. Exploiting opportunities produces results.

So, I’d look for someone who focuses on getting results rather than just solving problems.

But that’s just one opinion…(well maybe two, if you count Peter Drucker’s)

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