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Weekly Law Blog Roundup

Matthew Lerner’s weblog is profiled in a recent article about blogs in the New York Lawyer. The article notes that for Mr. Lerner, “a first-year associate at the law firm Goldberg Segalla, blogging offers a chance to start intellectual discussions about legal matters — the types of conversations routinely had as a law clerk.” Also, speaking of articles on lawyer blogging, check out the recent article in ‘The California Lawyer’, which features Denise Howell.

I can’t believe I didn’t know about Roger Bonine’s weblog before now (Dennis Kennedy’s recent post tipped me off). I gather that Roger is an IT guy at a law firm from his posts, but this isn’t made explicit in his ‘about me’ page. His weblog is called IT Manager.NET, and his tagline is ‘making the practice of law just a little geekier.’ Hey, I’m all for that.

For those of you looking for a good new criminal law weblog be sure to check out Crime & Federalism, which focuses on the intersection between federalism and federal crimes written by an anonymous writer who uses the name ‘James Madison.’ The writer is a third year law student at Pepperdine Law School. He’s an admitted devotee of Professor Randy Barnett. Interesting guy. Or, at least I think he’s a guy. You can never make any assumptions about anonymous writers, can you?

JudicialCheck.com is an interesting site that purports to rate attorneys, law firms and judges. Well, actually, other attorneys do the rating. It’s only available right now in California, but will soon be available for New York, Illinois, Florida and Texas. Denise Howell has some quick thoughts that she sets out here. I suspect a lot attorneys and judges will find time to comment/criticize this concept once it comes to a theatre near them. I like the concept, but I think the implementation needs improvement (mostly for the reasons that Denise alludes to).

Lastly, I highly recommend a blog called Wireless Unleashed. It’s run by Kevin Werbach, David Isenberg and Clay Shirky. All of those guys are bright and have interesting things to say about allocation of the wireless spectrum and about government policy regarding spectrum allocation. Kevin Werbach is a lawyer and used to work for the FCC. He’s also the driving force behind the SuperNova conference, which is only a month away (June 24 – 25 in Santa Clara, CA). If I could be at the SuperNova conference I would. Unfortunately, I can’t. But I can set my RSS reader to pick up the RSS/XML feed from the Wireless Unleashed weblog, and you can too.


P.S. If you appreciate these kinds of observations, you might want to read this as well.
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